Update on My Work · 1 day ago

Kurt here. I don’t post very often since Beth does such a great job at it. But I wanted to make an exception in the case because I just posted an update about the software that I am developing for a large Christian maternity clinic here in the Philippines.

Check it out on my website at kurtsymanzik.org. It has been about 9 months in development and it is about ready to be born … ironic.

— Kurt Symanzik

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Bible Dedication · 6 days ago

A Bible Dedication happened today.
For a language group I can not freely talk about.
Just know that after years and years of work by translators and language assistants, a large group of people here on Mindanao have been blessed with the Bible in their language.

What a blessing to be with other believers from every tribe and tongue.

Revelation 7:9 – 17
After this I looked, and behold, a great multitude
that no one could number, from every nation, from all tribes
and peoples and languages, standing before the throne and

before the Lamb, clothed in white robes, with palm branches
in their hands, and crying out with a loud voice,
“Salvation belongs to our God who sits on the throne,
and to the Lamb!”
Then one of the elders addressed me, saying, “Who are these, clothed in white robes, and from where have they come?”
I said to him, “Sir, you know.” And he said to me, “These are

the ones coming out of the great tribulation. They have washed their robes and made them white in the blood of the Lamb.

“Therefore they are before the throne of God, and serve him day and night in his temple; and he who sits on the throne will shelter them with his presence.
They shall hunger no more, neither thirst any more; the sun shall not strike them, nor any scorching heat.

For the Lamb in the midst of the throne will be their shepherd, and he will guide them to springs of living water,
and God will wipe away every tear from their eyes.”

— Beth Symanzik

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"Better Are The Honest..." · 8 days ago

We started this missionary journey in 2006 with the plan of doing the traditional four years on field, one year off for each term. But we are coming up to our 8th year on field with no furlough yet.
Why?
We took in orphan boys. We don’t regret that. James and Jerard have been such blessings to us, and though Jerard is now in Heaven with Jesus, not a day goes by I don’t think of him.
And as much as we enjoy being on the mission field, to be honest, after almost eight years on the field, we are tired. Kurt and I are probably in psychological terms burned out. We keep on getting up, doing our work, enjoying our kids but that spark of zeal has died to a low ember.
James’ adoption took much longer than we’d thought it would. And now we are working on getting his passport, visa and immigration. Another process taking longer than we’d been told. We are praying all this is done before June of 2015 so we can return as a family to the USA.
So, please keep us in prayer.

— Beth Symanzik

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"Ber" Months Are Here · 17 days ago

Let the Christmas music begin!!!!

And it has!
Blaring in the mall today, sounds of Christmas.
The “ber” months mark the start of the Christmas Season here in the Philippines!

Every Christmas season, Filipino homes and buildings are adorned with star-shaped lanterns, called paról from the Spanish farol, meaning “lantern” or “lamp”. These colorful stars represent the Star of Bethlehem that guided the Magi. (Tagalog: Tatlóng Harì).

Parol are as beloved and iconic to Filipinos as Christmas trees are to Westerners.

The most common form of the lantern is a 5-pointed star with two “tails” at the lower two tips. Other popular variations are four, eight, and ten-pointed stars, while rarer ones sport six, seven, nine, and more than twelve points. The earliest parols were made from simple materials like bamboo, Japanese rice paper (known as “papél de Hapón”) or crêpe paper, and were lit by a candle or coconut oil lamp.


we love getting Christmas boxes!!!


— Beth Symanzik

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September 8th · 18 days ago

Our school, being an international school, has various holidays it observes, some Korean, some Filipino, some American, etc.
Students will be off on September 8th to celebrate Chuseok – the Korean Thanksgiving.


Chuseok (추석) is one of the biggest and most important holidays in Korea. Family members from near and far come together to share food and stories and to give thanks to their ancestors for an abundant harvest. In 2014, Chuseok Day falls on September 8, but the holiday is observed for a total of three days (September 7–9). Fortunately, this year’s Chuseok holiday period makes for a 5-day weekend since Wednesday, September 10 was also designated a day off during this national holiday period. Many Koreans will visit their family homes to spend quality time together, and the holidays provide a good opportunity to enjoy traditional cultural experiences throughout Korea. (from http://english.visitkorea.or.kr/enu/SI/SI_EN_3_6.jsp?cid=811650)

It looks like they have some great food they serve on this holiday. I think we may try to make some or at least purchase some pre-made!

— Beth Symanzik

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